Passover 5781-2021

“The Final days of Pesach - Days of Unity”
(updated and revised from Passover 5761–2001)

For Jews who live in the Diaspora, the last day of Passover is meant to be a day of unity, הִתְחַבְּרוּת, hit’chab’rut, of coming together. Just as the ancient Children of Israel go down to Egypt as 70 souls, as members of 12 disparate tribes, and emerge as one united nation, so are contemporary Jews bidden to emphasize the many common bonds we have, rather than the differences. Passover, after all, is in the month of Nissan, the month of redemption. Only through unity, will the Jewish people be fortunate enough to achieve ultimate redemption.

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Tzav 5781-2021

Understanding Shabbat Hagadol
(updated and revised from Tzav 5762-2002)

Our commentators offer a host of reasons to explain why the Sabbath prior to Passover is called by the grand name "Shabbat Hagadol," the Great Sabbath. Whatever the reason for this Sabbath to be given such a distinguished name, it is always a very special Sabbath for the Jewish people.

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Passover 5780-2020

“The Essential lessons of Chametz and Matzah”
(Updated and Revised from Passover 5763-2003)

A major theme of the Passover holiday is the elimination of chametz-–leaven, and the substitution of matzah, unleavened bread, in its stead. Oddly enough, both chametz and matzah are made of the same ingredients, flour and water. Flour and water become chametz automatically if the mixture is allowed to stand. Matzah, on the other hand, before it is quickly baked, must be constantly kneaded and is not permitted to stand and ferment. We learn from the matzah-making process that truly meaningful life experiences never come effortlessly, but only through significant exertion and labor.

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