Pinchas 5778-2018

"Pinchas the Zealot?"

Pinchas is not rewarded for taking the lives of those who performed the public act of harlotry. It is only Pinchas’ courage to sacrifice everything meaningful in his life in order to stand up for the

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Kee Tavo 5773-2013

"Not Rushing to Judgment"

There are usually two sides to every story. We must always listen to, and carefully analyze, both sides, before jumping to what may be incorrect conclusions.

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Matot-Masei 5773-2013

“Pinchas Avenges the Midianites”

Why is the zealous Pinchas chosen to lead the people of Israel into battle against the Midianites?

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Tazria-Metzorah 5773-2013

"Ritual Impurity and Tzaraat: A Contemporary Understanding"

The Biblical texts of parashiot Tazria and Metzorah seem quite foreign to contemporary thinkers. It is possible, however, to interpret the challenging concepts reflected in these parashiot in a more contemporary light and in a manner that may be more palatable to modern thinkers.

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Tazria-Metzorah 5769-2009

"And He Shall be Brought to the Priest"

The expression, "And he shall be brought to the priest" is repeated in each of this week's double parashiot, Tazria and Metzora. This recurring phrase is explained by various commentators as having important contemporary implications and bearing vital lessons for both Israel and American society.

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Metzorah 5768-2008

"Modesty and Humility for All"

The Torah requires a homeowner who suspects that his house is afflicted with the disease tzah'rah'aht to call the Kohen and tell him, "It seems to me as if there is an affliction in the house." Our rabbis say that even if the homeowner is a scholar who knows for certain that the affliction is unquestionably tzah'rah'aht, the homeowner must not take it upon himself to say so definitively. There is much to be learned from this humble and modest approach.

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Kee Tavo 5766-2006

"Respect for the Person and the Office"

In the ceremony of the bringing of the Bikurim, the first fruits, the Torah tells us that the farmer shall come to the Priest who "shall be in those days." From these added words, the rabbis learn that we must treat the contemporary Priest with great respect, even though he may not measure up to the standards of the Priests of old. The Torah teaches us to respect not only the person of the Priest, but the office of the Priesthood as well. It is an important message for contemporary America, with many ramifications concerning the future of our country.

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