Eikev 5780-2020

“The Intermarriage Conundrum”
(updated and edited from parashat Eikev 5761-2001)

In Deuteronomy 7:3, the Jewish people are told not to give their daughters to the sons of the Canaanites or take their daughters for our sons. There really is no entirely compelling argument against intermarriage. It can only be appreciated by those who wish to play a role in the sacred mission of the Jewish people, to teach the world the idea of the sanctity of human life, and to work toward the perfection of the world under the rule of the Al-mighty.

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0 Comments17 Minutes

Tzav 5779-2019

"Remembering Amalek: A Contemporary View”
(Revised and updated from Tzav 5760-2000)

Jewish tradition looks upon Haman and all those truly wicked enemies who sought to destroy the Jewish people as the heirs of the ancient Amalekites, the fierce nation that was the first to attack the people of Israel, especially the stragglers and the weak, after the exodus from Egypt. While remembering Amalek is important, rebuilding and guaranteeing a Jewish future is far more important.

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0 Comments13 Minutes

Shavuot 5770-2010

"The Gift that Keeps on Giving"

How fortunate are we, Israel, to have received the gift of Torah, from the Al-mighty. Shavuot is the holiday on which we embrace Torah, as if we are receiving it for the very first time.

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0 Comments10 Minutes

Kee Tavo 5768-2008

"Redeeming Captives"

One of the truly haunting verses of the Torah that we encounter in Parashat Kee Tavo is the prediction that our sons and daughters will not be ours, for they will be led into captivity. The mitzvah of "Pidyon Sh'vuyim," redemption of captives, is one of the highest mitzvot in the hierarchy of biblical commandments. Redeeming our contemporary "captives" must be the call of the hour.

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0 Comments7 Minutes

Tzav 5768-2008

"Never Give Up Hope!"

The Torah teaches that in addition to lifting up a scoop of ashes and placing them near the altar, the priest must remove the accumulated ashes from the altar and bring them outside the camp to a pure place. The Beit Yaakov interprets this as a metaphor never to give up hope on any Jew. Even though the embers seem to be dying, we must enable them to glow again by placing them in a pure place.

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0 Comments9 Minutes

Nitzavim 5765-2005

"The Hidden Things Belong to G-d"

Parashat Nitzavim contains one of the most enigmatic verses of the Torah, which states that the hidden things are for the Lord, our G-d, but the revealed things are for us and for our children forever, to carry out all the words of the Torah. In their efforts to clarify the meaning of this verse, our rabbis offer a number of cogent elucidations. One of the most moving explanations is that, when the final redemption comes, the Jews who had become so assimilated (hidden) among other peoples that their origins have become forgotten will be reunited (revealed) with the rest of the Jewish people, and restored to their status as beloved members of the Jewish nation.

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0 Comments8 Minutes

Yom Hashoah 5762-2002

"Reflections on the Holocaust"

America's Jews are walking away from Jewish life in record numbers. Part of the problem may be due to the fact that obsessing over the Holocaust is exacting a great price on American Jews.
If we are to stop the hemmorhaging of Jewish life in America, intensive, positive, joyous, Jewish education experiences must become a priority.

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0 Comments9 Minutes

Eikev 5761-2001

"The Intermarriage Conundrum"

In chapter 7 of Deuteronomy, we are told not to give our daughters to the sons of the Canaanites or take their daughters for our sons. There really is no entirely compelling argument against intermarriage. It can only be appreciated by those who wish to play a role in the sacred mission of the Jewish people, to teach the world the idea of the sanctity of human life, and to work toward the perfection of the world under the rule of the Al-mighty.

Read More


0 Comments15 Minutes

Tzav-Purim 5760 – 2000

"Remembering Amalek: A Contemporary View"

Jewish tradition looks upon those who seek to destroy the Jewish people as the heirs of the ancient Amalekites, the fierce nation that was the first to attack the people of Israel, especially the elderly, weak and the young after the exodus from Egypt. While remembering Amalek is important, rebuilding and guaranteeing the Jewish future is far more important.

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0 Comments13 Minutes