B’ha’a’lot’cha 5779-2019

“Giving Our Disciples A Firm Grounding”
(Revised and updated from B’ha’a’lot’cha 5760-2000)

Because the Torah employs the unusual expression, “B’ha’a’lot’cha,” when you raise up and kindle the candelabra, our rabbis learn that the priests were to light each new candle in the Menorah until the flame of the new candle was able to rise on its own. This unusual expression is meant to serve as a message to teachers and mentors who are instructed to train and encourage their disciples to stand on their own feet, providing them with multiple educational and religious experiences, in order for them to emerge as healthy disciples, rather than mere sycophants.

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Eikev 5768-2008

"Fear and Reverence of G-d "

One of the most important aspects of belief is known as "Yir'aht Shamayim," generally translated as "Fear of Heaven." While it certainly means fear of retribution and punishment, it more definitively means reverence for G-d, awe of G-d through love. This more positive definition can have a meritorious impact on those who are walking away from Judaism who, unfortunately, too often perceive G-d as vengeful and wrathful.

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Balak 5767-2007

"The Enemy Within"

Who were Balak and Bilaam? According to Midrashic sources, they are both descended from Abraham's family. Balak was the son of Lot, while Bilaam was Laban's son and brother to Rachel and Leah. Jewish history has a long pattern of evil emanating from good and good emanating from evil. What accounts for this perplexing pattern?

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Yitro 5767-2007

"Will Our Children be Our Guarantors?"

The Midrash Tanchuma states that before He gave the Torah to the People of Israel, the Al-mighty insisted on guarantors. When the patriarchs were offered as guarantors, they were rejected. Only when the children of Israel were offered, did G-d accept. If our children are to effectively serve as guarantors, they must receive an intensive Jewish education of the highest quality.

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Balak 5764-2004

"How Goodly are Your Tents O' Jacob?"

Targum Jonathan, the Aramaic translation of the Torah, says that Bilaam saw the schools of the Jewish people and was moved to say: "How goodly are your tents O' Jacob?" The "number one" priority in Jewish life is to ensure that committed Jews remain committed. There is no better way of ensuring that commitment, than by providing outstanding intensive Jewish education for our children. If we fail to do so, then our Jewish future is in jeopardy.

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B’ha’alot’cha 5760-2000

"Giving Our Disciples a Firm Grounding"

Because the Torah uses the unusual expression, "B'ha'a'lot'cha," when you raise up and kindle the candelabra, our rabbis learn that the priests were to light each new candle in the menorah until the flame of the new candle was able to rise on its own. This unusual expression is meant to serve as a message to teachers and mentors who are instructed to train and encourage their disciples to stand on their own feet, providing them with multiple educational and religious experiences in order for them to become healthy disciples, rather than mere sycophants.

Read More


0 Comments11 Minutes