Shelach 5779-2019

"Finding Meaning in the Rituals"
(Revised and updated from Shelach 5760-2000)

In parashat Shelach we read the well-known third paragraph of the Shema prayer concerning the Tzitzit, the fringes. It is one thing to profess love of G-d and to accept responsibility and accountability. But, the bottom line in Judaism is always action! By emphasizing the ritual of Tzitzit, fringes, our sages tell us that the essence of our relationship with G-d is how we act toward Him. Professing our love for Him and accepting responsibility and accountability is simply not enough. This, once again, confirms that in Judaism, “rituals work,”–-they really do.

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Tetzaveh 5771-2011

"Do Clothes Make The Man?"

Just as the ancient priests, who served in the Temple, wore special vestments, so should every Jew be dressed in a special way, to reflect their spiritual roles as servants of the Al-mighty.

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0 Comments6 Minutes

Tetzaveh 5764-2004

"Keeping the Priests Humble"

The detailed description of the priestly garments, reflects lives thoroughly devoted to the service of G-d. While their vestments are royal and holy, they are, in essence, quite humbling, connoting accountability and responsibility. The sanctity and complexity of the priestly garments, reveal the multifaceted nature of the priests' lives, that are at once privileged and charged with awesome responsibility.

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Acharei Mot-Kedoshim 5762-2002

"Shaatnez: Understanding Irrational Decrees"

The laws of Shaatnez, in parashat Kedoshim, of not wearing wool and linen together, fall under the category of laws that are known as chukim--decrees which are commands from G-d that have no apparent rational reason. The esoteric laws of Shaatnez that appear so out of place in contemporary times have much to teach us about sensitivity toward others, and that the great gift of clothes must never be taken for granted.

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Shelach 5760-2000

"Finding Meaning in the Rituals"

In parashat Shelach we read the well-known third paragraph of the Shema prayer concerning the tzitzit, the fringes. It is one thing to profess love of G-d and to accept responsibility and accountability. But the bottom line is: actions! By emphasizing the ritual of tzitzit, fringes, our sages tell us that the bottom line in our relationship with G-d is how we act toward Him. Professing our love for Him and accepting responsibility and accountability is simply not enough. This, once again, confirms that in Judaism, "rituals work"--they really do.

Read More


0 Comments9 Minutes