Shalom Aleichem

In the Talmud (Shabbat 119b), Rabbi Josi the son of Judah is quoted as saying:

The positive angel and the negative angel who accompany us home from the synagogue are the angels to whom we sing Shalom Aleichem. These two angels remind us of the importance of the Shabbat atmosphere. The Shabbat is more than just a day of resting from work, it is a day infused with holiness.

Throughout rabbinic literature, one finds Shabbat referred to as both the “Shabbat Queen” and the “Shabbat Bride.” The accompanying angels are like royal servants who have come to make certain that everything is prepared for the arrival of the Queen. So grand is the arrival of Shabbat, that even preparing for its arrival brings extra blessings to one’s home.

Peace be unto you, ministering angels, messengers of the Most High,
the King of kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

May your coming be in peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,
the King of kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

Bless me with peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,
the King of kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

May your departure be in peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,
the King of kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

Shalom aleichem, malachei ha’sharayt, malachei elyon, mi’melech malchei ha’mlachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hoo:
Bo’achem l’shalom, malachei ha’shalom, malachei elyon, mi’melech malchei ha’mlachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hoo:
Barchunee l’shalom, malachei ha’shalom, malachei elyon, mi’melech malchei ha’mlachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hoo:
Tzaytchem l’shalom, malachei ha’shalom, malachei elyon, mi’melech malchei ha’mlachim, HaKadosh Baruch Hoo: