Hamantashen Recipe

Traditional

Hamantashen Recipe

From the kitchen of Roz Krieger z’l

Ingredients:

  • 3 Eggs
  • ½ Cup Shortening or margarine (not oil)
  • 1 Cup Sugar
  • 2 teaspoon Baking Powder
  • 1/4 Cup Orange Juice
  • 3 Cups Flour

Filling of your choice: chocolate chips, poppy seeds, strawberry jam…etc.

Blend eggs, shortening, sugar, baking powder, and orange juice together in a large bowl. Gradually add flour while using hands to work the dough until a soft ball forms and the dough comes away from the side of the bowl. Add flour as needed. While working with the dough, keep hands floured.
Roll out small pieces of the dough on a floured board. Take an average-size glass to use as cookie cutter and cut out circles. The uncut dough can be used for another batch of circles.

Place a small amount of filling into the middle of each circle and fold into a triangle. Be sure to pinch triangle edges together so that they stay closed.

WARNING: Too much filling will cause the hamantashen to “explode.”
Place hamantashen on a cookie sheet and bake at 350 until golden brown.


Dietetic Carrot Cake from Beryl Levenson

Dietetic

Carrot Cake

Although Rosh Hashanah is a time for eating sweet foods (in the hope of having a sweet new year), this Carrot Cake is a delightful treat!

Recipe Submitted by: Beryl Levenson

Ingredients:

    • 1 cup grated carrots
    • ½ cup chopped walnuts
    • ½ cup raisins
    • 2/3 cup Sugar Twin
    • ½ cup vegetable oil
    • 2 eggs
    • 1 cup flour
    • ½ tsp cinnamon
    • ½ tsp salt

Directions:

Combine Sugar Twin, oil, and eggs in a bowl and beat until blended.

Add flour, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, carrots, nuts and raisins. Stir well.

Pour mixture into pan and bake at 350 for 35-40 minutes.

Allow cake to cool completely before frosting.


Applesauce Kugel

Traditional

Applesauce Kugel

Ingredients:

    • 1 lb noodles (wide is better)
    • 4 eggs (beaten)
    • 2 Tbsp sugar
    • ½ tsp vanilla extract
    • ½ cup melted margarine
    • ½ cup raisins
    • 2 cups applesauce
    • ½ can pineapple pieces (Drained)
    • cinnamon and sugar mixture

Directions:

Cook noodles until nearly tender and drain.

Mix all ingredients except cinnamon and sugar mixture.
Mix well.

Pour into a large greased baking dish.

Sprinkle cinnamon and sugar on top.

Bake at 350 for 1 hour or until brown on top.


Carrot and Sweet Potato Tzimmes

Traditional

Carrot and Sweet Potato Tzimmes

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch carrots, peeled and cut into 1″ pieces
  • 6 sweet potatoes (large) peeled and quartered
  • ½ cup pitted prunes
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • ½ cup honey
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup margarine

Directions:

Cook carrots and sweet potatoes in boiling, salted water. Cover until firm yet tender. Line a 2-quart, shallow casserole dish with heavy foil. Drain carrots and potatoes and place in dish with prunes. Stir gently.

In a separate bowl, mix orange juice, honey, salt and cinnamon. Pour mixture evenly over potatoes- carrots-prunes. Dot with margarine. Bake covered (with foil) in preheated 350 oven for 30 minutes. Stir gently and bake for another 10 minutes uncovered.


Tammy Reid’s Sweet Challah

Traditional

Sweet Challah

Recipe submitted by Tammy Reid

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups flour
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 Tbsp honey
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 envelopes dry yeast
  • 4 Tbsp oil
  • drop vanilla
  • ½ cup raisins

Directions:

Mix dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients. Knead in raisins. If it seems too wet, add flour. If seems too dry add juice or water.

Allow to rise for 1 hour.

Knead down.

Mold dough into thick strands and curl into circular loaves. Allow to rise for another hour. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes, or until golden brown.


Chremslach (Latkes) Traditional

Traditional

Chremslach (Latkes)

Yield 10 to 12 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 6 to 8 Cooked Potatoes, grated
  • 1 Raw Onion, grated
  • 8 Eggs
  • 2 to 3 tbsp potato starch
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp pepper
  • 1/2 tsp onion powder (optional)

Directions:
Mix all Ingredients together thoroughly in a large bowl. (Fries better if left for 1/2 hour to 1 hour in refrigerator.)
Heat 1/4 inch deep oil on high heat. Drop batter by rounded tablespoon into hot oil.
When starting to cook, lower heat to medium.
Flatten latkes with a fork. Fry for 2 minutes on one side until light brown; turn and brown on other side.


Passover Sponge Cake

Traditional

Passover Sponge Cake (pareve)

Recipe submitted by Shirley Sobel.

Ingredients:

  • 9 large eggs
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup of orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon of lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup of mazoh cake meal
  • 1/4 cup of potato starch
  • pinch of salt

Directions:

Beat egg yolks; add sugar, beating until thick and lemon colored. Gradually add the orange and lemon juice. Add the matzah cake meal, potato starch and salt. Beat for 5 to 8 minutes on low speed.

In a second bowl, beat egg whites until they stand in peaks. Gently fold in the egg yolk mixture.

Bake in a 350 oven for 1 hour using a tube pan. Do not grease pan or cake will not rise.

When the cake is done, remove immediately, turn upside down on a soda bottle to cool. When cake is completely cooled, cut around the edges with a knife and remove the inner pan. Using knife loosen bottom and slice.


Passover Apple Cake

Traditional

Passover Apple Cake (Pareve)

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 c. of cake meal
  • 3/4 c. of potato starch
  • 2 1/3 c. of sugar
  • 5 eggs (separated)
  • 1 c. of orange juice
  • ½ teaspoon of salt
  • 4 apples (peeled and thinly sliced)
  • 2 teaspoons of cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla

Directions:

Preheat oven to 325. Mix cake meal, potato starch and 1 ½ cups of sugar in one bowl. Make a well in the center, and drop in the egg yolks. Add orange juice and vanilla, beat until smooth.

In another bowl, beat the egg whites and salt until stiff. Gradually beat in ½ cup of sugar, and continue beating until very stiff. Fold into batter and pour into greased 9×13 inch baking pan. Arrange apple slices on top. Combine the remaining 1/3 cup of sugar and the cinnamon. Sprinkle over apples, bake 45 min-1hr or until done.


Matzo Brei

Traditional

Matzo Brei (pareve)

Ingredients:

  • 4 matzot
  • warm water
  • 1 onion
  • 4 eggs
  • salt and pepper

Directions:

Soak Matzot in warm water. Drain and squeeze out excess water. Beat eggs and seasonings, mix well with matzot. Heat oil, dice & saute onion, mix with matzoh mixture, form into patties, fry in oil. For a lower fat version, bake the patties.


Passover Crepes with Mushroom Sauce

Traditional

Passover Crepes With Mushroom Sauce (pareve)

Recipe submitted by Rachel Goldberg.

Ingredients:

    • 5 eggs
    • 1/2 cup of potato starch
    • pinch of salt
    • 3 tablespoons of water

Mix all ingredients. Heat a small circular skillet with a bit of oil. Pour in some of the batter. Pick up the pan and rotate it, so the crepe leaf is thin. Once it has cooked through (about 40 seconds to 1 min) pick up the pan and bang the leaf out on to a clean dish towel. Repeat until all batter is used up.

Filling: Boil 4 potatoes, mash with fried onions and salt. Fill leaves with potato mixture, fry.

Mushroom Sauce:

    • 2 onions
    • 2 cups of diced mushrooms
    • 2 heaping tablespoons of potato starch
    • 1 teaspoon of sugar
    • 1 cup water
    • 1/4 cup of dry white wine
    • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Saute 2 onions, add 2 cups of diced mushrooms. Add salt and pepper to taste + 1 teaspoon of sugar. Slowly stir in 3/4 cup of water + 1/4 cup of dry white wine. Add 2 Tablespoons of potato starch mixed with 1/4 cup of cold water. Stir constantly until mixture thickens (about 2 minutes). Pour over crepes and serve immediately. Garnish with fresh parsley, if desired.


Charoset

Traditional

Charoset (Pareve)

Suibmitted by: Rosalind Rosenbaum

This delicious combination of wine, nuts, and apples is eaten at the Seder to commemorate the mortar which the Jews were forced to build with in Egypt. You can spread it on Matzoh, or eat it straight from the jar. (No double dipping!) There are many variations, here is a basic one.

Ingredients:

  • 1 C. nuts (finely chopped)
  • 1 apple (grated)
  • dash of ginger
  • 1 tablespoon of brown or white sugar
  • sweet red wine
  • cinnamon to taste

Directions:

Mix together nuts, apple, cinnamon, ginger and sugar. Add wine slowly until the mixture has reached a paste-like consistency. Adjust seasonings to taste.


Gourmet Shabbat

Kosher

This compilation of delicious recipes are all you’ll need for an incredible gourmet Shabbat meal everyone will love.

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Print the Gourmet Shabbat booklet or use the interface on this page to view or download.

Shabbat

The Jewish Sabbath has been called an “oasis in time.” This heavenly gift is a unique opportunity for spiritual and psychological renewal that comes every week!

Learn more

Programs and Classes

Host or join one of our renowned Shabbat programs, and find out how you, your family and your community can participate.

Resources

Discover, read, share and download our Jewish Treats Guide to Shabbat, a fantastic resource to the Day of Rest.

Articles

Browse our collection of Shabbat Jewish Treats, filled with interesting stories and articles about Shabbat.


Passover Squash Kugel

Traditional

Passover Squash Kugel (Pareve)

Recipe submitted by Debby Goldman.

 Ingredients:

  • 1½ green squash, peeled
  • 1 med. onion
  • 4 eggs (separated)
  • 1 cup of potato starch
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Grate the squash and onion; there should be approximately 1 to 1 ½ cups of grated squash. Add squash to beaten egg yolks, and stir in potato starch. Beat egg whites until stiff and add to squash mixture. Season with salt and pepper, bake in greased 8×8 pan at 350 for 50 minutes.


How To Keep Kosher

Introduction

We are living in quite unusual times, especially for Jews. Remarkably, perhaps miraculously, Jews of all ages and backgrounds, are now taking steps to return to the heritage of their ancestors. Hence, the growing interest in kashruth, and kosher homemaking. While you may or may not have already decided to kosher your home, it’s important that you realize that making your home kosher is not only the fulfillment of a religious precept, but also a vital social and national action. By making your home kosher, any Jew, from anywhere in the world will feel welcome in your home, and by taking this important step, you will also be saying that you wish to identify with the Jewish people, and be a part of their cultural legacy.

One can become obsessive about almost any activity in life. Koshering one’s home can seem overwhelming, but it need not be. In fact, with all the modern appurtenances, a home can be kashered in very few hours, and even if mistakes are made, now, or in the future, they can be readily corrected. Not only your rabbi, but also many observant lay Jews are knowledgeable enough to help you, and are eager to do so.

Whatever you do, do it slowly and considerately. Ask your rabbi or a knowledgeable advisor to come to your home and explain to you exactly what is going to happen. Let him/her inspect your pantry and examine the products, and teach you how to identify kosher products and the major kosher symbols. Let the advisor review the dishes, pots, pans, utensils, silverware and indicate to you the various actions which need to be taken for kashering, which utensils may be saved and which must be discarded. Kashering your home is a bonding action with the Jewish people, past, present, and future. Be calm, relish the experience, work diligently, and before you know it you will look upon the kashering process as a wonderfully meaningful memory.

The basic principle to bear in mind when kashering is: the way the non-kosher food substances are absorbed into the walls of the utensil, that is the way it is expelled. Hence, a pot used for stewing can be kashered by boiling; a pan used for frying or baking can be kashered only by blowtorching (direct contact with heat).

How To Kasher an Oven

Gas & Electric
The most difficult item to kasher properly is the oven, because it requires an absolutely thorough cleansing. Please note the following steps in cleaning:

  1. The oven should not be used for twenty-four hours prior to kashering.
  2. Spray all internal surfaces of the oven with a chemical cleanser to remove all surface dirt.
  3. Disassemble the inner parts of the oven: remove grates, the shelf separating the oven from broiler, remove the entire broiler and its drawer.
  4. Check all of the above surfaces for dirt. Use chemical cleanser a second time, scrub with steel wool, screwdriver, and/or a scraper to remove remaining spots. Carefully check difficult areas (use a flashlight, if necessary): internal corners, door edges, the area behind the flame burners, and the grooves of the broiler tray shelves. CAUTION: Do not disturb the thermostat wire. The interior of oven should look new.
  5. Reassemble the oven. Set the oven dial at top heat (broil) for 1« hours. Unless the broiler tray is blowtorched (or heated in a self cleaning oven cycle) food should never be placed directly on it. Cover the tray with the aluminum foil or place food in a pot or pan on the broiler tray.
  6. Some have the custom of blowtorching the interior surfaces of the oven in order to assure the removal of any remaining dirt.

Self-Cleaning
Self-cleaning ovens are self kashering. Kasher the oven automatically by putting it through one full cleaning cycle, (approximately 3 hours). Don’t forget to clean the top cooking area, as indicated below.

Gas Range Tops

  1. Disassemble and remove spiders, burner jets, drip trays, and the entire oven top if possible.
  2. Clean with steel wool, soap and water.
  3. Clean the entire surface under top of the oven.
  4. Reassemble the cooking surface and ignite the fire under the spiders at top heat until they glow red (15-20 minutes). If possible, invert spiders so that they get closer to the fire source.

Electric Stove Top
Follow the above cleansing procedures. Set the electric burners on the highest setting until they glow red after a few minutes.

Cooking In A Kosher Oven

There are various customs with respect to cooking milk and meat dishes in the same oven. Some people only cook meat in their ovens, and have small toaster ovens for milk dishes.
A second custom is to wait 24 hours between the cooking of milk and meat. The most lenient custom is to wait until the oven has cooled between the cooking of milk and meat. If the milk or meat is tightly covered (e.g. aluminum foil) it is not necessary to wait. If there is any spillage of meat, the oven may not be used for milk before it is cleaned thoroughly and set at top heat, and vice versa. It is wise to line the oven bottom and check the broiler for any spillage before cooking.

Microwave
Clean the microwave oven thoroughly and put a vessel with a few ounces of water in the oven. Allow the water to vaporize into steam.

How To Kasher Silverware

Silverware made of one piece of metal can be kashered. However, any utensils with a plastic, wood, or bone handle which will be damaged by boiling water cannot be kashered. If the plastic, wood or bone will not be damaged and can be cleaned properly. it may be kashered, employing the following procedure. Clean the utensils thoroughly of food and rust (especially at the joints). Wait 24 hours. Kasher the silverware by dropping them, one by one, into a vat of boiling water. Make sure that:

  1. The water is actually boiling when you place the silverware in the vat (Remember, that placing the utensils in the vat often lowers the temperature of the water below the boiling point).
  2. Large utensils may be purged in the water, one side at a time. But make certain that the part that you are immersing is completely surrounded by water.
  3. Remove the utensil and rinse in tap water. Use tongs or place a soft wire basket into the pot to help with removal.

How To Kasher Pots and Pans

  1. Metal (not enamel or teflon) pots and pans not used for frying, which can be thoroughly cleaned, can be kashered by the boiling method described above. If there is accumulated dirt under plastic pot handles, they must be removed before kashering.
  2. Frying and baking pots and pans can be kashered by slowly and deliberately glowing the utensil with a blowtorch,by placing them in a self-cleaning oven during a full cleaning cycle (not advised). It is usually very difficult to kasher them correctly. If possible, replace these utensils with new ones.

How To Kasher A Sink

A sink made of metal can be kashered by rinsing every square inch of the sink with boiling water (the water must be boiling right before you pour it.) Porcelain sinks cannot be kashered. In both instances it is wise to purchase plastic sink tubs, one for milk dishes and one for meat dishes.

How To Kasher Counters

Counters made of nonporous material can be kashered. (Anything porous like butcher-block counter must be sanded down and then kashered.) Simply follow the procedure applicable to sinks. It is preferable not to place hot utensils directly on the counters.

How To Kasher Dishes

China, earthenware, porcelain, corningware, corrella, pyrex, duralex enamel, glazed stoneware, may be kashered only by reglazing in a kiln at 900 F for one minute, or in a self-cleaning oven for an entire cycle. Extreme caution should be exercised since very delicate items may not be able to withstand the intense heat. Valuable porcelain dishes which were not used for one year, may, in consultation with your rabbi, be kashered by dipping in boiling water 3 times.
Glassware used for cold, or for tea and coffee may be kashered by soaking in room temperature water for 72 hours, changing the water every 24 hours.

How To Kasher A Refrigerator

A refrigerator may be made kosher by thoroughly cleaning with soap and water.

The Mikvah

Metal and glassware utensils used in preparing and serving food require immersion in a Mikvah (ritual pool).

Kosher

Kashruth in the 21 century is far more than a religious ritual. It is, in effect, a profound bond that unites Jew to Jew, a most meaningful tether that secures an individual to a nation, it is the sacred energy that connects a people and a nation to its very essence.

Recipes

We know you want the good stuff, skip ahead to all the great Kosher recipes on NJOP.

Kosher

Learn more about keeping Kosher and browse our collection of delicious recipes.

Resources

Discover the resources, exciting programs and interesting stories here on NJOP.


The Case For Keeping Kosher

The Case For Keeping Kosher

Kashruth – An Interpretation for the 21st Century
by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald
The recent growth in the observance of kashruth – Jewish dietary laws, despite their great antiquity, is rather unexpected. At a time when many Americans have distanced themselves from tradition, the rise in demand for kosher food is particularly surprising. But more remarkably…

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Print Kashruth - An Interpretation for the 21st Century by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald or use the interface on this page to view or download.

Kosher

Kashruth in the 21 century is far more than a religious ritual. It is, in effect, a profound bond that unites Jew to Jew, a most meaningful tether that secures an individual to a nation, it is the sacred energy that connects a people and a nation to its very essence.

Recipes

We know you want the good stuff, skip ahead to all the great Kosher recipes on NJOP.

Kosher

Learn more about keeping Kosher and browse our collection of delicious recipes.

Resources

Discover the resources, exciting programs and interesting stories here on NJOP.


Kreplach

Kreplach

Reprinted with permission from “Jewish Art Calendar”.
Published by A cable to Jewish Life www.cablejew.com

Dough Ingredients:
2 cups flour
½ tsp. salt
3 Tbsps. oil
2 egg yolks
½ cup water
1 ½ tsps. baking powder or baking soda

  1. Combine flour, salt, and oil.
  2. In a separate bowl, beat egg yolks, water and baking powder (or soda).
  3. Add to flour mixture.
  4. Knead and rollout, thinly, on floured surface.
  5. Cut into 3 inch squares or circles.

Filling Ingredients:
1 onion, diced
2 Tbsps. oil
1 cup ground cooked meat or chicken
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 egg
1 Tbsp. matzoh meal

  1. Saute onion in oil. Add chopped meat and brown for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.
  2. Add salt, pepper, egg and matzoh meal, and mix well.
  3. Fill center of each square or circle of dough with meat mixture. Fold into triangles, or bring both sides and bottom together towards center, pinching together, and thus forming a triangle.
  4. Place folded triangles in lightly salted boiling water for approximately 20 minutes until kreplach float to top.
  5. When ready, remove from pot and serve in soup or as a side dish.
    For firmer kreplach, fry in heated oil in skillet over medium flame until golden brown on both sides.