Jewish Calendar

By using the Jewish calendar as often as you can, you can fulfill the mitzvah of remembering the Exodus, which is the official starting point of the current Jewish monthly calendar.

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Learn the Jewish Calendar

The Jewish people mark time through the Jewish calendar. Every Jewish person should possess a consciousness of Jewish time.

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Calendar Count

Mark a calendar to help you keep track of counting the omer.

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Calendar Tick

Mark your calendar and make plans for celebrating Purim next Wednesday night-Thursday.

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Calendar

If you don't already have one, print or purchase a calendar marking the Jewish months.

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On Calendar

Make certain to mark Yom Kippur on your calendar for Wednesday, September 23 (beginning at sundown on the 22nd).

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Calendar Check

Own at least one Jewish calendar to keep track of the Jewish months and holidays.

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Calendar Awareness

Be aware that this Shabbat, which happens to be July 4th, is also the 17th of Tammuz, a notorious day in Jewish history.

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On The Calendar

One week from today is Tisha B’Av, the fast of the ninth of Av. (It begins at sunset on Monday night.)

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The Pope and the Jewish Prayer for Rain

Did you know that several centuries ago, a Pope impacted Jewish law? Most Jewish events of note are based on the Jewish calendar. That’s why it’s surprising to learn that the date when…

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Leap Year

The Gregorian solar calendar used by the Western world, is based on the cycle of the sun. Technically, the tropical (solar) year is 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes and 16 seconds.…

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Leap Year

The Gregorian solar calendar used by the Western world, is based on the cycle of the sun. Technically, the tropical (solar) year is 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes and 16 seconds.…

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An Eight or Nine Day Week?

Practically all civilized humanity has agreed on some basic common measures to mark time. A day consisting of 24 hours follows the natural rotation of the earth on its axis. The lunar…

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Leap Year

The Gregorian solar calendar used by the Western world, is based on the cycle of the sun. The tropical (solar) year is 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes and 16 seconds. Thus every four years…

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Leap Year

The Gregorian solar calendar used by the Western world, is based on the cycle of the sun. The tropical (solar) year is 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes and 16 seconds. Thus every four years…

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For Dew and Rain

As indicated by Jewish prayer, the rainy season in the land of Israel begins just after the holiday of Sukkot and ends at the start of Passover. During this time, there are two special…

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For Dew and Rain

As indicated by Jewish prayer, the rainy season in the land of Israel begins just after the holiday of Sukkot and ends at the start of Passover. During this time, there are two special…

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Pinchas 5767-2007

"Rosh Chodesh, the Modest Holiday" by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald Parashat Pinchas opens with the Al-mighty praising Pinchas, grandson of Aaron the High Priest, for fatally stabbing Zimri,…

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New Years x 4

We are about to celebrate the New Year on the Gregorian Calendar. But, did you know that the Jewish calendar actually has FOUR New Years! 1) The first of Nissan, the month in which…

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If Shabbat Is Saturday, Why Does It Begin On Friday Night?

There Was Evening, And There Was Morning... When following the Gregorian (secular) calendar, it is natural to think of the days of the week as Sunday, Monday....Friday, Saturday, each…

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Saying Hello

The Jewish calendar, unlike the secular/Gregorian calendar, is a lunar calendar. The first commandment given to the Israelites in Egypt (Exodus 12) is to count and begin the months with…

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If Shabbat Is Saturday, Why Does It Begin On Friday Night?

There Was Evening, And There Was Morning... When following the Gregorian (secular) calendar, it is natural to think of the days of the week as Sunday, Monday....Friday, Saturday, each day…

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Midnight

A day is divided into 24 equal units of time (hours). Different cultures, however, define the beginning (and end) of a day differently. For instance, while a day on the Gregorian calendar…

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Midnight

A day is divided into 24 equal units of time (hours). Different cultures, however, define the beginning (and end) of a day differently. For instance, while a day on the Gregorian calendar…

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Is It Almost Spring?

February 2nd, is Groundhog Day, when thousands breathlessly wait to see if the groundhog is scared into six more weeks of hibernation by the sight of his shadow. This tradition reveals…

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Navy Man

In honor of the anniversary of the founding of the United States Navy in 1794, which is tomorrow, March 27th,  Jewish Treats presents a biography of Uriah P. Levy, the U.S.’s first…

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Emor 5761-2001

"The Gift of Celebration" by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald In the second half of this week's parasha, parashat Emor, there is a review of most of the Biblical festivals of the Jewish…

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Emor 5779-2019

“The Gift of Celebration” (Revised and updated from Emor 5761-2001) by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald The second half of this week’s parasha, parashat Emor, presents a review of most of the…

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Kinnot

KinnotMany devastating events took place on the 9th of Av. This is why the Jewish people consider it the saddest day on the…

9/11 and Jewish History

The attack on the continental U.S. homeland on September 11, 2001, changed the entire complexion of the United States. Almost 200 years had passed since the last attack on the U.S.…

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