A Twentieth Century Jewish Poet

In honor of National Poetry Month, Jewish Treats presents a brief biography of Muriel Rukeyser (December 1913-February 1980). Born and raised in New York City, Rukeyser attended Vassar…

Read More

Sources Commentators

Abarbanel (1437-1508, Spanish statesman, philosopher and commentator) Achad Ha’Am (Asher Zvi Hirsh Ginsberg, 1856-1927) AJOP (Association for Jewish Outreach Programs) Akeidat Yitzchak…

Krymchaks: The Unique Jews of Crimea

The Crimean Peninsula, which extends into the Black Sea, has been home to a succession of dominant cultures. Among the many who have settled in this region have been Jews, whose presence…

Read More

Mishpatim 5770-2010

"The Blessing of Health" by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald Toward the end of this week's parasha, parashat Mishpatim, G-d promises Moses that He is sending an angel before the Jewish people to…

Read More

Shabbat Prayers

Learn AboutShabbat Prayers Table of Contents Morning Blessings (Birkhot Hashachar) Verses of Praise (Pesukei Dezimrah)…

Inauguration Oil

Elected U.S. presidents are inaugurated on January 20th. But, it wasn’t always that way. The Congress of the Confederation set March 4, 1789, as the date for “commencing proceedings” of…

Read More

The Sino-Jewish Axis

During Associate U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan’s 2010 confirmation hearings, she was asked where she had spent the previous Christmas. With a broad smile, Ms. Kagan responded,…

Read More

Smokeout

As the world changes, the modern day sages must often reevaluate the application of Jewish law in order to correlate it with the findings of contemporary medicine. One of the best…

Read More

A Day that will Live in Infamy

In one of the 20th century's most memorable and impactful speeches, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt called December 7, 1941, “A day that will live in infamy,” due to the deadly…

Read More

Never Too Late To Educate

It is a well-known fact that Judaism places tremendous emphasis on education. Thousands of years ago Rabbi Simon ben Shetach (75 B.C.E.) instituted compulsory school attendance. The…

Read More

Eden in the Garden State

The first residents of the current state of New Jersey were Dutchmen from New Amsterdam (New York) who settled Jersey City in 1614. Some historians claim that in 1655, some Jews from New…

Read More

Jews in the Fold

Yesterday, November 11, was celebrated internationally as National Origami Day. (Jewish Treats did not publish this essay yesterday in deference to Veteran’s Day.) Origami is a compound…

Read More

The Jews of Wyoming

While Wyoming is not a state known for its sizable Jewish community - there are today, only approximately 1,150 Jews - the history of its community is over 140 years old. The territory of…

Read More

The Jews of Wyoming

While Wyoming is not a state known for its sizable Jewish community - there are today only approximately 1,150 Jews - the history of its community is over 140 years old. The territory of…

Read More

The Jews of Brazil

The Jewish community of 21st century Brazil is much like that of other South American Jewish communities. The Brazilian Jewish community is diverse, consisting of Ashkenazim and…

Read More

The Jews of Paris

In honor of the people of Paris, Jewish Treats presents a broad overview of the early history of the Jews in the City of Light. Settled in the 3rd century B.C.E. by the Parisii tribe, the…

Read More

Lech Lecha 5772-2011

“The Two Covenants” by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald In this week’s parasha, parashat Lech Lecha, we learn of two covenants, the Covenant Between the Pieces and the Covenant of Circumcision…

Read More

The Law of Return

On July 5th, 1950, corresponding to the 20th of Tammuz, the Israeli Knesset unanimously passed the “Law of Return ”(LoR). The timing of the bill’s passage was intended to coincide with…

Read More

Acharei Mot-Kedoshim 5762-2002

"Shaatnez: Understanding Irrational Decrees" by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald Once again, this week, we have combined parashiot--Acharei Mot-Kedoshim. The theme of the second parasha,…

Read More

Jewish Buckeyes

In 1817, when a pioneering watchmaker, Joseph Jonas, settled in Cincinnati, OH, from his native England, a permanent Jewish presence in Ohio was established. The Cincinnati Jewish…

Read More

Kedoshim 5774-2014

“The Prohibition of Taking Revenge” by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald In this week’s parasha, parashat Kedoshim, we find the ever-popular verse of Leviticus 19:18, וְאָהַבְתָּ לְרֵעֲךָ…

Read More

Jewish Buckeyes

In 1817, when a pioneering watchmaker, Joseph Jonas, settled in Cincinnati, OH, from his native England, a permanent Jewish presence in Ohio was established. The Cincinnati Jewish…

Read More

Labor, Technology and the Torah

Labor celebrations have taken place throughout North America since the 1880s, and Labor Day became an official U.S. holiday in 1894. As students of history are well aware, in the decades…

Read More

Joosiers

Individual Jews first came to what is known today as the State of Indiana in the early years of the 19th century. Jacob Hays, who moved to Cahokia (now situated in Illinois) in 1822 was a…

Read More

Adding Candles

Lighting Shabbat candles is an essential element of Shabbat. The Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law) states that two candles are used to fulfill the mitzvah in order to…

Read More

New Hampshire’s Jewish History

As Americans await the outcome of today’s New Hampshire primary, Jewish Treats takes a look at Jewish life in the ninth state of the Union. While the Jewish population of New Hampshire…

Read More

The Jews of Elephantine

Follow the Nile River southward and one comes upon an island upon which are the unique ruins of an ancient Jewish military installation. The Jews of Elephantine Island, which is located…

Read More

Employees and Employers

The American labor movement, which developed in the late 19th century, strived to ensure that workers were paid fairly, were provided with a safe working environment and were protected…

Read More

The Little Synagogue on the Prairie

Once upon a time, around 1916, a small community of Jewish settlers on the Canadian prairie built a synagogue. Like many other edifices of that time and place, it was small, sparsely…

Read More

Labor, Technology and the Torah

Labor celebrations have taken place throughout North America since the 1880s, and Labor Day became an official U.S. holiday in 1894. As students of history are well aware, in the decades…

Read More