Terrror at the Olympics

On July 27, 1996, the world was startled when a pipe bomb exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia. The bomb killed one person directly, another indirectly (heart attack)…

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Terror at the Olympics

On July 27, 1996, the world was startled when a pipe bomb exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia. The bomb killed one person directly, another indirectly (heart attack)…

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Terror at the Olympics

On July 27, 1996, the world was startled when a pipe bomb exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia. The bomb killed one person directly, another indirectly (heart attack)…

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Dancing on Ice

Competing for artistic and athletic mastery on ice has been part of the fun of winter long before the Winter Olympics, and Jews have often taken part in the joy of ice skating. In…

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Dancing on Ice

Competing for artistic and athletic mastery on ice has been part of the fun of winter long before the Winter Olympics, and Jews have often taken part in the joy of ice skating. In fact,…

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The Mother of Modern Swimming

In 1920, at age 35, Charlotte Epstein was not a contender for an Olympic medal in Antwerp, but she was, in many ways, the hero of women’s swimming. Born in 1884 in New York City, "Eppy,"…

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Speedy

Buckle up, look both ways...follow basic safety procedures.The speed skating competition at the 1928 Olympics, held in St. Moritz, Switzerland, ended in a literal “melt down.” During the…

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Harari. Michael Harari

Most people have never heard the name Michael “Mike” Harari. Given his vocation, he probably would approve of his anonymity. Born in Tel Aviv, Michael Harari (1927-2014), enlisted in the…

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The Paralympics’ Jewish Roots

The competitive spirit of this year’s Summer Games in London did not end with the Closing Ceremony. From August 29 - September 9, 2012, thousands of athletes with physical disabilities…

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Athlete and Architect

When Arnold Guttmann was 13 years old, his father drowned in the Danube River, and Arnold decided that he needed to learn how to swim. Six years later, after changing his name to Alfred…

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No Chance to Compete

The International Olympics were conceived as a competition meant to foster peace and comradery. Alas, that lovely ideal has often been too difficult for people to live up to.  One…

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The Paralympics’ Jewish Roots

The competitive spirit of this year’s Summer Games in Rio did not end with the Closing Ceremony. From September 7 - September 18, 2016, thousands of athletes with physical disabilities…

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Counting on You?

Every nation seeks to know how many citizens it has, which can also inform the nation of the quantitative strength of its armed forces. In democratic countries, counting the nation also…

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Golda

Stories of the Zionist leaders of the early twentieth century usually begin: "He came from Poland (or Russia) and...” Golda Meir’s account, however, begins quite differently: She came…

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An Extraordinary Run

When Harold Maurice Abrahams was born on December 15, 1899, movies were short, silent and black-and-white. It would have been impossible to imagine that this newborn baby boy would one…

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Games in Tel Aviv

This week is the main week of the 2016 Paralympic Games being held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. These Games, which provide a competitive opportunity for people with disabilities, receive…

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Jewish Judo

If you have tuned in to the Olympics, you have possibly glimpsed scenes from the numerous levels of the women’s Judo competition. While Judo has been part of the Olympic games since 1964,…

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Left Jab

Even those who are unfamiliar with boxing can picture the subtle dance of the boxer in the ring. The art of moving subtly about the ring, the elaborate footwork, sparring and…

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An Extraordinary Run

When Harold Maurice Abrahams was born on December 15, 1899, movies were short, silent and black-and-white. It would have been impossible to imagine that this newborn baby boy would one…

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Joosiers

Individual Jews first came to what is known today as the State of Indiana in the early years of the 19th century. Jacob Hays, who moved to Cahokia (now situated in Illinois) in 1822 was a…

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Vayishlach 5763-2002

"We Can Forgive the Arabs For Killing Our Children..." by Rabbi Ephraim Buchwald As we learn more and more Torah, we cannot help but realize that we frequently learn revolutionary…

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Shemot 5776-2016

"By What Right Does Moses Kill The Egyptian?” by Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald In this week’s parasha, parashat Shemot, we learn that Moses, who was raised in the royal house of Pharaoh,…

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Toledot 5779-2018

NJOP stands in solidarity with the Squirrel Hill community in Pittsburgh and expresses its profound condolences to the members and families of the Tree of Life Congregation who lost their…

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What A Player!

Today marks 171 years since the first official game of baseball was played on June 19, 1846. In honor of this anniversary, today’s Jewish Treat presents a brief biography of a unique…

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Heading to the Catskills

As the summer holiday season begins, Jewish Treats presents a mini-biography of Jennie Grossinger, who was once called “the best-known hotel keeper in America.” Her drive and her hosting…

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Using A Live Virus

Mention the polio vaccine and most people think of Jonas Salk. The fact is, however, that the polio vaccine used today is actually based on the work of another Jewish physician, Albert…

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Hebrew Union College

In honor of Jewish-American History Month, Jewish Treats presents the history of Hebrew Union College. Bohemian-born Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise (born Weiss, 1819-1900) arrived in the United…

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He Marched With King

Abraham Joshua Heschel (1907-1972) was a twentieth century Jewish theologian whose intense commitment to social action brought him to the heart of the Civil Rights movement.  Born…

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Betty Boop, Popeye and Superman – The Jewish Connection

Name the first talking animated film. The answer most people usually offer is Walt Disney’s Steamboat Willy (1928). In actuality, however, the first talking cartoons were produced by…

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Watch With Awe

If you are watching the Olympics, take a moment and contemplate the incredible abilities God gave the human body.

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